The colors of the diamonds



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The naturally colored diamonds are very rare and the red diamonds are the rarest of them all – most jewelers have hardly seen any of those. The diamonds with a natural red color are in high demand and have some of the highest prices per carat.

 

When people think of diamonds they most often imagine a colorless stone. Besides the red diamonds there are and blue diamonds, pink diamonds, black diamonds, green diamonds, orange diamonds, yellow diamonds, brown diamonds and even diamonds described as champagne color or cognac.

 

In the jewelery world the attention to colored diamonds increases. They are also becoming increasingly sought after by the consumers. The marketing campaign of the Argyle mine in Australia draws attention to the diamonds in champagne color and to the improved quality and affordability of the diamonds with artificially enhanced color.

 

The natural colored diamonds are extremely rare and valuable. Only one in ten thousand diamonds has a color. The artificially colored diamonds are more affordable and allow a greater choice of colors.

Diamond with artificially enhanced color is a natural diamond that has been subjected to radiation from high-energy electronic particles.

The diamonds are sometimes heat treated at higher temperatures in order to emphasize the color even more. These procedures are completely safe and the color is permanent.

In the remote area of Australia East Kimberly is located the Argyle mine, which is the largest producer of diamonds with champagne color. The colors of champagne of the diamonds from slightly golden amber to champagne and rich deep colors of cognac are natural and are caused by different elements with very low presence in the diamond itself and also by some crystal violations.

 

A little known fact is that the diamonds exist naturally in many more colors than most of the other precious stones.



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